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Archive for the ‘long island’s gold coast’ Category

The gates to Fergusons Castle

The gates to Ferguson's Castle (click to view large)

The Monastery, also known as Ferguson’s Castle, located in Huntington Bay, was one of Long Island’s Gold Coast’s most impressive estates. Today all that remains is a wall too massive to tear down, a gatehouse, some ruins, some memories, and perhaps the ghost of the woman who built it.

Go to A Gothic Cabinet of Curiosities and Mysteries to read the article

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Chelsea Manor, click to view large or order prints

Chelsea Manor, click to view large or order prints

Chelsea Manor, in the Muttontown Preserve in East Norwich, New York, was built by Benjamin Moore and his wife Alexandra. Moore was the great, great grandson of the author of the Night Before Christmas, also known as “a Visit From Saint Nicholas,” Clement Clarke Moore. It’s also a great place to sit in the snow and tell Christmas ghost stories. Go to A Gothic Cabinet of Curiosities and Mysteries to read the article

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Memorial Cemetery of St. Johns Church - Click to view large or buy print

Memorial Cemetery of St. John's Church - Click to view large or buy print

The Memorial Cemetery of St. John’s Church, designed by the Olmstead Brothers, who designed the gardens at Planting Fields Arboretum, Oheka Castle and many other Gold Coast Estates – a lovely place to spend an afternoon or an eternity.

Go to A Gothic Cabinet of Curiosities and Mysteries to read the article

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The Hempstead House, click to view large or buy print

The Hempstead House, click to view large or buy print

The history of Castlegould and the Hempstead House in Sands Point, New York. Discover the story behind the construction and life of two of Long Island’s most incredible buildings, view photos of the gothic architecture, and relive the sex and scandal worthy of Jay Gatsby and F. Scott Fitzgerald. Go to A Gothic Cabinet of Curiosities and Mysteries to read the article

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